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Friends of Native Arts

Frederic Huntington Douglas was one of the first scholars to recognize the artistic achievements of American Indians as well as the arts of Africa and Oceania. From 1929 to 1956, as the Denver Art Museum's curator of native arts, he began acquiring the objects that form the core of what is now recognized throughout the world as one of the most important collections of native arts. In 1974 the Douglas Society, now Friends of Native Arts: The Douglas Society, was founded to honor and ensure the continuance of the work of Frederic Douglas.

 

You must have an active DAM membership to join FoNA.

 

$1000 - FoNA Connoisseur Membership

Friends of Native Arts Connoisseur Membership

 

This level of membership includes all of the benefits of Family membership at a higher level of overall support to the Friends of Native Arts, plus invitations to private receptions and special tours.

 

$125 - FoNA Patron Membership

This level of membership includes all benefits of the Family membership at a higher level of overall support to the Friends of Native Arts.

 

$250 - FoNA Benefactor Membership

This level of membership includes all of the benefits of a Family membership at a higher level of overall support to the Friends of Native Arts.

 

$50 - FoNA Individual Membership

This level of membership includes participation in all Friends of Native Arts events as well as the quarterly email newsletter.

 

$500 - FoNA Collector Membership

This level of membership includes all benefits of a Family membership at a higher level of overall support to the Friends of Native Arts, plus invitations to private receptions and special tours.

 

$75 - FoNA Family Membership

This level of membership includes all of the benefits of an Individual membership for two adults plus all children (age 18 and under) in a household.

 

Charles Ratton and the Invention of the Modern "Tribal Art" Market with John Warne Monroe

 

The present-day market for historical African, Oceanic and Native American art is distinctive.  In its general aesthetic approach, it relies heavily on the norms and values that govern the market for modern and contemporary art; its conception of authenticity and approach to connoisseurship, in contrast, derive from the antiques trade.  This unique mixture first emerged in Paris between the two world wars, and took on the form it retains to this day thanks to the innovative commercial strategies the noted dealer Charles Ratton developed between 1927 and 1939.  This lecture will explore this pivotal decade of Ratton s career by focusing on the various ways he marketed historical African sculpture both in France and in the United States.  As we will see, Ratton s success as a trans-Atlantic promoter of African sculpture does much to explain why Paris continues to remain the capital of the  tribal art  world.

John Warne Monroe teaches European cultural history at Iowa State University.  He is author of two books, including Metropolitan Fetish: African Sculpture and the Imperial French Invention of Primitive Art, which will be out in September 2019.

There will be a small reception in the lower level lobby outside of the boardroom starting at 6pm.

Image Courtesy of the Speaker.

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